Senate releases proposed Congressional Map, moves Clyde out of Ninth?

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proposed congressional map

ATLANTA – The proposed Senate Congressional Map, presented by Lt. Governor Geoff Duncan and Senator John F. Kennedy, Chairman of the Senate Redistricting and Reapportionment Committee, makes significant changes to the Ninth District.

The map places Jackson County in the Tenth District. Ninth Congressman Andrew Clyde (R-Ga) resides in Jackson County. If the proposed map passes, Clyde could no longer serve as the Ninth Representative.

The proposed map places Pickens County entirely in the Ninth District. Also, Forsyth County moves entirely into the Sixth District and out of the Ninth. Madison, Elbert, and part of Clarke shift into the Tenth District as well.

Northern Gwinnett becomes part of the Ninth District and out of the Fourth but remains in the Seventh and Tenth.
The Senate bill will now go to the house and then into conference.

Every 10 years, the legislature redraws district lines according to Census population data. The political future of the state often hangs in the balance. Currently, Republicans control the House and Senate in the General Assembly.

“It is clear that this map not only meets principles of redistricting, but we are proud to present a map that regardless of political party, Georgians can be proud of,” said Lt. Governor Geoff Duncan. “Ensuring that any maps we produce are fair, compact, and keep communities of interest together, will continue to be of upmost importance.”

“Even given the delay of official Census numbers, the Senate Redistricting Committee has diligently worked to ensure that we hear from citizens across all regions of the state,” said Chairman John F. Kennedy. “Looking at this map, it is obvious that Georgians have been heard, and will continue to be heard.”

Georgia has 14 U.S. House seats, 56 state senators, and 180 state house members. 2020 Census data placed 10.7 million people in Georgia. Districts should have an equal number of people across those U.S. House, state senate, and state house districts.

Lawmakers on the Joint Reapportionment Committee are responsible for developing the new district maps. Sometime later this fall, the General Assembly will convene a special session concerning redistricting in Georgia.

Rep. Clyde discusses several Democrat sponsored bills

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andrew clyde bills

ELLIJAY, Ga – Ninth District Representative Andrew Clyde (R – Ga) spoke about recent bills passed by the House of Representatives.

H.R. 127 focuses on gun control legislation and Clyde urged every American to call their Representatives concerning all the firearm bills. Universal background checks are a part of H.R. 8 and H.R. 1446 closes the Charleston loophole.

“There was no Charleston loophole,” Clyde asserted. “That bill simply extends the amount of time that the government has to respond to a background check.

The Representative, and gun store owner, plans to introduce another bill to change background check responses from three business days to three calendar days. He cited an issue that arose during the pandemic where some people had to wait weeks or months to pass background checks because the government was shutdown.

The Senate filibuster might prevent H.R. 8 or 1446 from moving forward. The bills would need 60 Senators agreeing to bring it to the floor for a vote.

Restore America Act

Clyde also focused on the Restore America Act and the provision for farmers and ranchers facing discrimination. 120 percent of a farmers’ USDA loan would be paid off under the bill, H.R. 1319. The 20 percent takes care of the taxes on the loans.

“There’s not discrimination there. The fact that they even got a loan is proof that’s there’s not discrimination,” Clyde spoke, “Pay off these farmers, 120 percent of their loan, but only if you are of another ethnicity other than white. Now that is racist, that is absolutely racist.”

Ninth District Representative called out Senator Raphael Warnock (D – Ga) and Coca-Cola for supporting the bill. He added, “how can that not bill a criminal violation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964?” He wants the Department of Justice to investigate the provision based on the Civil Rights Act.

Later, Clyde commented that the bill is “biased toward blue states” because it’s based on unemployment numbers. Several Democrat-run states continue to experience higher unemployment than Republican states. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, in December 2020, California had an unemployment rate of 9.1 while Georgia’s unemployment rate was 5.3 percent.

As for H.R. 1, the bill regulating elections on the federal level, Clyde believes it will die in the Senate.

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